How effective are international efforts to ease the problem of global hunger?

YES: International efforts to ease global hunger have been mostly effective due to proper identification, planning and execution of efforts and programs by relevant stakeholders in the international community.

  1. The timely provision of humanitarian relief supplies by international relief agencies to famine-stricken countries and regions have staved off deaths and malnutrition, alleviating global hunger to a fair degree. 

  2. The sharing of technological advances in food production between countries and intergovernmental organizations, such as the International Rice Research Institute, has contributed greatly to increasing food supplies in many developing countries, ensuring adequate supply to food for the poor and significantly reducing global hunger.

  3. International cooperation and agreement between countries at the international level to maintain stockpiles of staple foods have stabilized food prices, ensuring that it remains affordable to most.

NO: International efforts to ease global hunger have been mostly ineffective due to the poor identification, planning and execution of efforts and programs by relevant stakeholders in the international community or other factors impeding the overall effectiveness of aid.

  1. Unfortunately, local governments in some famine-stricken countries have impededrelief operations by stealing food supplies or actively refusing to cooperate with the international relief agencies, aggravating global hunger as a whole.

  2. The international community has not been effective at all in curtailing the exploitative practices of multinational food conglomerates, which use advanced technological processes in food production competitively against local farmers in poor countries, leading to periodic food shortages and increased hunger for the poor globally.

  3. Increasingly, some countries take a self-interested approach to food security and adopt monopolistic practices, such as leasing land from poorer countries to grow food for sole export to their own countries, significantly distorting global food prices and aggravating food supply shortages in hunger stricken countries.